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    EMST 150 Trainer by Aspire

    The EMST 150 is the first calibrated expiratory muscle strength trainer designed specifically for individuals who want to enhance their breathing and swallow function. It was created by physiologists who recognized the importance of people with different needs to train muscles involved in their activities and also be able to measure their progress over time.
    Product #: 2EMST150

    Now those who use the EMST 150 are able to tailor their exercise regime and help achieve results with greater effectiveness and in less time. The EMST 150 is so lightweight and portable that it can fit in your briefcase, purse or gym bag. People of all ages from seniors to baby boomers to Gen X and from elite athletes to golfers and singers can take advantage of the EMST 150 trainer!

    WHY USE EXPIRATORY TRAINING DEVICES?

    There is simply no machine at the gym that can accomplish this for you or your patient. If you are in need of improving the force production of the expiratory muscle group and/or endurance of your breathing, these devices can do that for you simply and in a short duration of time.

    IS RESEARCH ONGOING IN EXPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH TRAINING?
    Yes. Multiple studies currently ongoing with differing populations.Contact us for the most up to date information

    HOW LONG SHOULD IT TAKE ME TO DO MY DAILY TRAINING SETS?
    Typically it takes 15 -25 minutes.

    CAN I TAKE A BREAK BETWEEN SETS?
    Yes, but not too long. Try to take a few extra minutes between sets but don’t let 20-30 minutes lag between sets.

    HOW ARE DEVICES CLEANED?
    Simply clean the devices with dishwashing soap and rinse thoroughly with warm water. Devices may be cold sterilized using cidex. Contact us for details.

    WHEN WILL I EXPERIENCE RESULTS?
    Studies in the strength training literature show that muscles begin to change after the second week of training.  This will vary based on a number of factors such as health, age, athletic ability, and consistency of using the EMST 150.

    WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU STOP TRAINING?
    When physical training is stopped or the body undergoes long periods of inactivity (detraining), it loses some or all of the positive adaptations gained from physical training.  This principle suggests that in order to maintain benefits from an exercise program, continual training must occur throughout the lifetime. No matter the disease process or the therapeutic target, continued training through a maintenance program in essential for continued benefit.

    WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN INCENTIVE SPIROMETRY, BLOWING UP A BALLOON AND EXPIRATORY STRENGTH TRAINING?
    Incentive spirometry devices have been designed to help patients maintain open airways following surgery.  These devices do not load the respiratory muscles, in fact, they have been found in recent research studies to have insufficient training resistance. Also, incentive spirometers are strongly influenced by airflow rate (i.e. how much air and how quickly you move it through the device).  Resistive trainers and resistive maneuvers (like blowing into a balloon) can involve either small orifices to breathe through that can become progressively smaller or the devices have multiple small holes with a decreased number of opened holes as the device’s dial is turned.  Resistive trainers are also impacted by breathing pattern, that is, airflow rate.

    HOW DO I ESTABLISH INTENSITY OF TRAINING?
    When developing a respiratory training program several training variables are manipulated: frequency of training, intensity of the task, and number of sets of the exercise to be completed.  There are two main physiologic principles that underlie the concept of strength training. First, the exercise stimulus must be sufficient to elicit a change in muscle function. This is referred to as “stimulus intensity” and is usually defined in terms of the amount of load (or weight) of load, and duration of the exercise task. Second, is the “frequency” of the exercise stimulus which is usually defined in terms of how many times the exercise is performed (minutes per day/ days per week/ total weeks).  Therefore, in an attempt to develop evidence-based guidelines, researchers in the area of respiratory training have modeled their paradigms off of the exercise literature describing limb training.  In the limb, for instance, it is recommended that strength training be completed at 75-80% of maximum strength.  Therefore, most respiratory strength training paradigms have followed that model.  But in the case of some populations with pathology/disease, 75-80% of MEP may not be doable at baseline.  Instead, the clinician should begin the patient at a level at which the patient can be successful for at least 25 repetitions.   MEP or MIP should be reassessed weekly and the training level of the device should modified based on changes in strength.

    WHO IS NOT A CANDIDATE FOR RESPIRATORY TRAINING?
    As with any training paradigm, it is important that clinicians determine whether the patient is a proper candidate for the selected training.  The exact effects of respiratory training on intrathoracic and intracranial pressures have not been explored at length.  Despite this, various large sample studies have reported no adverse events secondary to these training paradigms, but these studies often exclude persons with cardiovascular disease or history of stroke.   It is also important to note that intrathoracic pressures developed with respiratory training (which can be as high as 150cmH20) are lower than those developed during a normal bowel movement or strong cough.

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